Posts Tagged:CO2


EARTHtalks: Dare to be great!

On Thursday May, 16th, the annual EARTHtalks brought together renowned speakers and many (especially young) people interested in climate change and the environment in Vienna’s imperial Hofburg. In her introductory remarks, Freda Meissner-Blau chose “We want a lively planet” as the theme for this inspirational event which is organized by NEONGREEN Network as an “Initiative…

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Global risks: Climate change, financial crisis and inequality

My previous blogpost already mentioned the World Economic Forum’s recently released “Global Risks Report“. According to this report, cliamte change, the financial crisis and inequality are today’s three biggest risks and together form a multifaceted economic, societal and environmental crisis whose symptoms and challenges are highly interdependent. In the following, I would like to highlight some interesting first insights from the…

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2009-09-22 um 12-01-13

After the Fiscal Cliff, let’s focus on the Climate Cliff

Stock exchanges can be happy: In the latest possible moment (actually, even a bit later), the embarrassing US Fiscal Cliff negotiations came to the anticipated successful and positive ending with a lot of compromise (and a deferral of the problem, as if negotiators would have studies Austrian grand coalition politics). So, as we’ve found a solution to the…

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BC’s carbon tax is a success story for the economy and the climate

Last week, I also visited a Carbon Talks lecture on “BC’s Carbon Tax Shift: What’s Working? What’s Next?” where I got an insight into Sustainable Prosperity’s recent evaluation of BC’s carbon tax shift. BC’s carbon tax was introduced in July 2008 as North America’s first carbon tax. It started at a price of $10 per…

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2009-10-24 um 15-11-21

There’s no such thing as “clean coal”!

It was recently reported that the European Union will additionally invest € 50 billion in energy technology research over the next ten years. Unfortunately, a closer look at the actual numbers reveals that 40% of the funds will go into the technologies of the past (nuclear and coal), with € 13 billion for carbon capture…

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